Satoru Hoshino & Chung Hsi-Han, Texture; SinArts Gallery, The Hague

Satoru Hoshino

Although SinArts Gallery tries to show art by Chinese artists and artists from the Chinese diaspora, it also puts its art into a broader international context: the Southeast Asian and the West European contexts.

Satoru Hoshino

In the present exhibition it shows works by the Japanese artist Satoru Hoshino (1945) and the Dutch artist with Chinese-Indonesian roots Chung Hsi-Han (1958).

Satoru Hoshino

Satoru Hoshino’s ceramic sculptures show the ultimate use of clay.

Satoru Hoshino

Clay, when used for modelling, gives a certain resistance in that it will always maintain its volume.

Satoru Hoshino

If you push or press it, it will bulge beneath your hands.

Satoru Hoshino

It will always react, it will always have the last word, which creates, especially in Satoru Hoshino’s works, a kind of dialogue between the artist and his material.

Satoru Hoshino

In Hoshino’s ceramic sculptures the volumes of clay almost become a kind of organic creatures.

Chung Hsi-Han

To make the story even more international, Chung Hsi-Han especially found inspiration in Nepal, where he also discovered Nepali paper on which the presented works are made.

Chung Hsi-Han

Also with Nepali paper one could say that it is the paper which has the last word.

Chung Hsi-Han

It both resists and absorbs in such a way that you may wonder what the next stage in Chung Hsi-Han’s work may be.

Chung Hsi-Han

Will he show us both sides of the paper next time?

Chung Hsi-Han

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© Villa Next Door 2022

Contents of all photographs courtesy to Satoru Hoshino, Chung Hsi-Han and to SinArts Gallery, Den Haag

Bertus Pieters

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Neighbour North Sea; Quartair, The Hague

Tanja Engelberts

If Egypt is the Gift of the Nile, the Netherlands are the Gift of the North Sea.

Astrid Nobel

The North Sea gives this country international trade, fish and other seafood, oil, wind energy, sand, recreation, communication, fertile land, an enormous sewer, enviable wealth and economic power.

Astrid Nobel

The Dutch derive their self-importance from its supposedly heroic battle with the sea water.

Astrid Nobel

With the rising of the sea levels due to climate change, this battle may well become less heroic.

Astrid Nobel

Moreover, the Dutch seem to take the North Sea for granted; its economic and military exploitation continues intensively.

Astrid Nobel

In doing so, the idea of necessity is usually directly linked to an efficient business model.

Sheng-Wen Lo

To the Dutch necessity means business: if there is no business in it, it is not necessary.

Sheng-Wen Lo

In that they don’t differ from their North Sea neighbours Germany, Denmark, Norway, Britain, France and Belgium.

Sheng-Wen Lo

It’s just that the Dutch derive their national pride from it.

Laura Schippers

The North Sea also gave Dutch art the idea of seascapes.

Laura Schippers

Especially the ones from the seventeenth century became immensely popular nationally and internationally, and laid the foundation for an artistic tradition.

Laura Schippers

A more postmodern or post-postmodern tradition can be experienced in Quartair’s present show Neighbour North Sea, featuring works by Tanja Engelberts (1987), Sheng-Wen Lo (1987), Astrid Nobel (1983) and Laura Schippers (1985).

Tanja Engelberts

Indeed some of the exploitation of our maritime neighbour can be seen and interpreted in the show.

Tanja Engelberts

However, it also shows very diverse aesthetics and ways of seeing and feeling.

Tanja Engelberts

Whether it is the monumentality of an obsolete oil platform, or the sheer magic of the sea itself.

Tanja Engelberts

By the way, i wrote an article about one of the works on show by Astrid Nobel in Villa La Repubblica. Click here to read the article in VLR (in Dutch).

Tanja Engelberts

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Contents of all photographs courtesy to the artists and to Quartair, Den Haag

Bertus Pieters

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Façades of The Hague #154

Block with shops and apartments, Hoefkade in between Doedijnstraat and Jacob Catsstraat.

It was built around the beginning of this century as part of the renovation and rehabilitation of the whole neighbourhood.

Undeniably the quality of the housing has strongly improved.

However, the architecture is rather matter-of-fact and painfully unremarkable compared to the elegant and colourful façade that used to adorn the corner of Jacob Catsstraat and Hoefkade.

 © Villa Next Door 2022

All pictures were taken in March 2020.

Bertus Pieters

Façades of The Hague from #146 onwards: https://villanextdoor3.wordpress.com/category/facades-of-the-hague/

Façades of The Hague #1 – 71: https://villanextdoor.wordpress.com/category/facades-of-the-hague/

Façades of The Hague #72 – 145: https://villanextdoor2.wordpress.com/category/facades-of-the-hague/

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Hans Arp, The Final Work; Kunstmuseum, The Hague & Bezuidenhoutseweg, The Hague

The things / we call lifeless / are not lifeless at all. / They often rub / their hands with glee / and laugh up / their sleeves / for joy at / not being human

Well, there you are: more than twenty pictures about an exhibition at Kunstmuseum The Hague, with only eight objects.

And three of them are even omitted in this report! But what an exhibition it is! It is all about the last stone sculpture made by Hans /Jean (depending whether you are more German or French inclined) Arp (1886-1966), and today still on public show along Bezuidenhoutseweg.

Arp was asked in 1964 to make a sculpture for the then new and modern neighbourhood.

It became Scrutant l’horizon (Looking out over the Horizon), which was placed in 1966.

The whole story of how the work was commissioned and made can now be seen and read in the Kunstmuseum.

The museum obtained Arp’s plaster model for the work in 1964.

After Arp’s death some bronze casts were made of this plaster model, two of which are now on show, together with the plaster model.

That in itself already makes it a great but intimate show.

At least, it caused a kind of photographic frenzy in me, as you can see here.

The sheer repetition of the sculpture and the difference in patina of the two bronzes are a feast for the eyes.

As such this small presentation is both art historically and aesthetically a gem.

Apart from the three Scrutant l’horizons there are five more works by Arp on show, a sculpture and two reliefs amongst others.

Arp was also a prolific poet in both German and French and two examples, in both languages, are present in the show, breaking the barriers between seeing and reading.

in infinite space / he stood / on his left arm / holding up the earth / with his right arm / when the bursts of fire / from fallen angels hit him // an incandescent fruit / a terrifying fruit / beat in his breast

The German poem is more deliberate in its content, while the French poem grows in the mind like his sculptures.

If there would be a shortcoming in the exhibition, it should be the fact that there is no recent picture of the present state of the public work on show.

So, the next day i rushed to Bezuidenhoutseweg to make a few pictures of Scrutant l’horizon there, which are included here as well.

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© Villa Next Door 2022

Contents of all photographs courtesy to the estate of Hans Arp and to Kunstmuseum, Den Haag

Bertus Pieters

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Thank you PARTS Project!

Lucio Fontana

Last Sunday PARTS Project in The Hague closed its doors after almost seven years.

Jann Haworth
Diet Sayler
Ewerdt Hilgemann
Jaap van den Ende

It showed 23 projects, and when the planning wasn’t congruent with time or reality, it hosted other exhibitions.

Jaap van den Ende
Jan Van Den Dobbelsteen
Jan Van Den Dobbelsteen

It gave us an idea of private collecting, i.e. the artistically interesting and passionate part of it.

Gutai
Jeroen Doorenweerd
Jos van Merendonk
Jos van Merendonk

Almost all 23 projects were intriguing and all of them of high quality.

Pim Voorneman
Marijn van Kreij
Bob Law, Jos van Merendonk

Initiator Cees van den Burg always put a maximum of energy into the shows, although when reality worked out not to synchronise with PARTS’ idealism it was clear the energy had to be diverted.

Bob Law
Paul Neagu
Paul Neagu
Peter Bogers

Anyway, it was an interesting, inspiring and fruitful period in The Hague’s recent exhibition history, and personally i am extremely grateful to Cees and his foundation for inducing this.

Peter Bogers
Robert Holyhead
Robert Holyhead
Shah Jahan

Surely, many will have the same feelings and will experience the closure of PARTS Project at Toussaintkade as a bitter loss.

Shah Jahan
Werner Cuvelier
Werner Cuvelier
Zhang Shujian

A big thank you to PARTS Project!

Zhang Shujian

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Contents of all photographs courtesy to the (estates of the) artists, the owners of the works and the PARTS Project Foundation, Den Haag

Bertus Pieters

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