Façades of The Hague #152

Block with apartments, Stille Veerkade.

It was built in 1923 in an eclectic style somewhat reminiscent of 17th and 18th century Dutch classicism, maybe in remembrance of the 17th century origins of Stille Veerkade.

Stille Veerkade (“Silent Ferry Quai”) was built as an extention of Amsterdamse Veerkade in the second quarter of the 17th century to expand The Hague’s commercial harbour facilities.

Today the harbour has been filled in, and both Veerkades have become an access road for traffic to and from the town centre.  

© Villa Next Door 2022

All pictures were taken in March 2020.

Bertus Pieters

Façades of The Hague from #146 onwards: https://villanextdoor3.wordpress.com/category/facades-of-the-hague/

Façades of The Hague #1 – 71: https://villanextdoor.wordpress.com/category/facades-of-the-hague/

Façades of The Hague #72 – 145: https://villanextdoor2.wordpress.com/category/facades-of-the-hague/

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Alexandre Lavet, (,’/,) ; Dürst Britt & Mayhew, The Hague

Suppose you open the bedroom door, because you need a little siesta.

Just to switch off the thinking and the senses for fifteen minutes.

Everything around you sleeps with you.

Works of art are packed and rest until they have to manifest themselves again to a viewer.

Receipts and other printed notes hang silently and harmlessly on the wall, and a cartoon character also takes a nap, while the titles of restful works of art lie, lean or hang here and there.

There are also books, and yes, they are about resting, sleeping, dreaming, but you cannot read them, because you sleep yourself; that’s okay, because you can’t open or browse them anyway.

Even the storage space is allowed to rest, as the packaged artworks have been moved into the bedroom.

Sifted light caresses through the room so as not to wake you from your slumber.

There are pillows and a little further on, the Goethe fountain is sleeping wrapped up near the place where once its water flowed.

Even the packaging of your lunch is lying dormant.

While you and everything around you in the room are in a private no man’s land, the rest of the world chirps, stumbles, mumbles, knocks and rustles steadily; sometimes you can still hear some vague fragments of it.

Alexandre Lavet (1988) is currently letting you experience it all at Dürst Britt & Mayhew under a title that cannot be pronounced, because the letters are also temporarily asleep.

Lavet himself is also represented at rest by his pyjamas and slippers, and of course throughout the installation, where even his humour sleeps in more and less inconspicuous tromp l’oeils.

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© Villa Next Door 2022

Contents of all photographs courtesy to Alexandre Lavet and Dürst Britt & Mayhew, Den Haag

Bertus Pieters

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Moshekwa Langa, Omweg (Detour); KM21, The Hague

To write a review for Villa La Repubblica about Moshekwa Langa’s (1975) present show i went to KM21 in The Hague. Click here to read the review in VLR (in Dutch).

The pictures here can be seen as additional to the VLR article. As I’ve written quite extensively about the exhibition I leave you here with these pictures without comments, except that I warmly recommend the show to you.

Click here to read the review in Villa La Repubblica (in Dutch).

Now that you’ve come here, you might as well subscribe to Villa Next Door (top right of the page)!

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© Villa Next Door 2022

Contents of all photographs courtesy to Moshekwa Langa and KM21, Den Haag

Bertus Pieters

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Paul Klemann & Cedric ter Bals, Elective Affinities (Die Wahlverwandtschaften); Galerie Maurits van de Laar, The Hague

Cedric ter Bals

Surely, it is to be hoped for that this exhibition will end not even half as catastrophic as Goethe’s Elective Affinities.

Paul Klemann

It must be said though that many in this sheer infinite abundance of drawings by Paul Klemann (1960) and Cedric ter Bals (1990) at Galerie Maurits van de Laar are quite inauspicious. Perhaps that is less so for Klemann’s drawings with their surrealist scenes, although you never know in surrealism.

Cedric ter Bals

There is always a double entendre and objects and situations in these drawings may not always be what you would wish for. The sweetest desires may turn out to be as hot as a Madame Jeanette pepper.

Cedric ter Bals

In Ter Bals’s drawings it is more a matter of re-living a catastrophe, in particular World War I. That catastrophe was indeed death ridden to the utmost.

Cedric ter Bals

Millions of soldiers died quite for nothing and military heroism became not much more than a mockery (as it so often is).

Paul Klemann

In Ter Bals’s work it is both mockery and seriousness, well, they are not even two sides of one coin, they are both sides in one.

Cedric ter Bals

Apart from a plethora of drawings – varying from monumental to small and cartoonlike – he also shows pages of the sequel to his 2019 comic book Tagebuch Oskar von Balz (Oskar von Balz’s Diary), about which i wrote quite extensively in Villa La Repubblica (in Dutch; click here).

Paul Klemann

The elective affinity between the two artists is that Ter Bals saw work by Klemann and immediately saw a kindred spirit in him.

Paul Klemann

Such that he wanted to be coached by Klemann, who has of course an artistic experience of quite a few decades, in which Ter Bals succeeded with the help of the Mondriaan Fund.

Cedric ter Bals

There are indeed similarities between the works of the two artists in spite of the generation gap.

Paul Klemann

Both artists are uncompromising in what their unbridled imagination forces them to draw. One could describe it as an amoral stance towards imagination.

Paul Klemann, Cedric ter Bals

However, that is one thing, another is that the imagination has to be presented on a piece of paper with pencils etc.

Cedric ter Bals

So, the imagination, unbridled and amoral as it is, has to be moulded such that it has a maximum impact on the viewer. Both are masters in doing so. But indeed a younger artist always needs support in it.

Cedric ter Bals

There are however  great differences as well. For instance Klemann uses space in quite another way than Ter Bals does.

Paul Klemann

Klemann’s space is usually quite well defined although it is also elastic like in a dream, while in Ter Bals space can be quite flat or non-existent if there is no need for it.

Paul Klemann, Cedric ter Bals

Also Ter Bals usually has well defined personalities who tell part of the same story if you see more of his works. His works can stand on their own, but become more meaningful in the context of the rest of his work.

Paul Klemann

That even counts for his more monumental drawings which try to be so comprehensive.  A lot more could be said about the works of both artists, but i leave that to others for the time being.

Cedric ter Bals

If you have no ability to put things into perspective, or if you have no sense of humour, this show may be a challenge which i heartily recommend to you.

Paul Klemann

But even if you are less disabled you should take enough time to see everything in this exceptionally full exhibition. Enjoy, and be moved and astonished!

Cedric ter Bals

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© Villa Next Door 2022

Contents of all photographs courtesy to Paul Klemann, Cedric ter Bals and Galerie Maurits van de Laar, Den Haag

Bertus Pieters

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Façades of The Hague #151

Narrow building with ornate shopfront and elegant extension with balcony, Wagenstraat. It was built in 1911 in the elegant style of the period with obvious Art Nouveau influences.

The ground floor used to house the locally famous lunchroom “Klink”. In the 1980s i lived round the corner and i was a regular guest, as it also served dinner at an extremely reasonable price. The dishes were decently old fashioned Dutch with pork or beef, cooked vegetables and either boiled potatoes with gravy or baked potatoes with mayonnaise. Most famous however were their fantastic rolls and buns.

Today there is an Asian take-away. Maybe someday i should give that a try…

© Villa Next Door 2022

All pictures were taken in March 2020.

Bertus Pieters

Façades of The Hague from #146 onwards: https://villanextdoor3.wordpress.com/category/facades-of-the-hague/

Façades of The Hague #1 – 71: https://villanextdoor.wordpress.com/category/facades-of-the-hague/

Façades of The Hague #72 – 145: https://villanextdoor2.wordpress.com/category/facades-of-the-hague/

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Rein Jelle Terpstra, Dark Dunes (Donkere duinen); Fotomuseum, The Hague

For people who lived in countries occupied by the Germans during World War II, that time became a trauma, which became hereditary for generations to come. In fact, those who deny this or do not know it, understand little of the society they live in.

As the generation that lived through World War II becomes smaller and smaller, that war period is increasingly becoming a myth. In the process, it is forgotten that there was also an everyday life.

For instance, there was an anonymous photographer who took pictures of the landscape, objects and things from everyday life. The negatives were collected by artist Rein Jelle Terpstra (1960).

The photographer added the dates, shutter speeds and aperture stops. The negatives are now presented at Fotomuseum Den Haag in the exhibition Donkere duinen (“Dark Dunes”).

The negative images are presented as a kind of dream images; knowing that in dreams, any obviousness can turn into doom or open-endedness. At the same time, enlargements of front pages of the Algemeen Handelsblad – a daily newspaper during the war – are exhibited as if to illustrate the doom lurking behind the pictures.

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© Villa Next Door 2022

Contents of all photographs courtesy to Rein Jelle Terpstra and to Fotomuseum, Den Haag.

Bertus Pieters

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Opening of a new space. Gallery Nono & SinArts Gallery, The Hague

The new cultural season has been opened last weekend in different venues in The Hague and especially at Boekhorststraat, where two galleries opened a new shared space.

Wim Nival, Gallery Nono
Alex De Bruycker, Gallery Nono

Gallery Nono mainly existed on line until now and SinArts Gallery had a temporary space at Korte Vijverberg (as regular readers of Villa Next Door may know).

Nono’s gallerist, showing the back side of the same work by Alex De Bruycker

They now settled down in this lively street in the city centre, in the same street where 1646 and Page Not Found are.

Nuria Maria, Gallery Nono
Camille Truyffaut, Gallery Nono

Nono and SinArts will alternate their exhibitions but last Sunday they opened with a shared presentation.

Zhu Hong, SinArts Gallery

It is a group show with works by some nineteen artists in a space that is both small and spacious.

Choi Wong, SinArts Gallery

The two wide and welcoming, early twentieth century shop windows will guarantee a very public view of the exhibited art that will hopefully intrigue the passers-by.

Liao Zhixin, SinArts Gallery
Zhang Peng, SinArts Gallery

Personally i’m very much looking forward to the exhibitions that will follow and Villa Next Door wishes both galleries a happy and inspiring future in their new place!

Left to right: gallery assistant, Alex Lebbink (SinArts) and Renée van Nievelt (Nono). A painting by Bertrand Fournier (Nono) in the background.

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© Villa Next Door 2022

Contents of all photographs courtesy to the artists and to Nono and SinArts Galleries, Den Haag.

Bertus Pieters

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Coby Brinkers & Rik van Hazendonk, Iron & Indigo; Kadmium, Delft

Iron & Indigo, with sculptures by Coby Brinkers and paintings – mainly watercolours – by Rik van Hazendonk, is the last exhibition in a series made during the last six or seven years by the present exhibition committee of Kadmium, Delft.

In the mean time the gallery has moved to the second floor of the building, having lost its unique space at the ground floor.

It remains to be seen if the new committee will make it worth climbing the stairs to the gallery.

As for now it ends with a dialogue between Brinkers’ sculptures – the biggest ones in steel – and Van Hazendonk’s big watercolours.

The watercolour on the floor was made live by Van Hazendonk during the first few days of the show, where visitors could see him work on it.

The central floor piece makes the dialogue between the artists’ works quite real and as such it is a master stroke for the exhibition.

The works by Brinkers stand alongside as if to reflect in the water of the floor piece, but instead their vertical shapes mirror in the shiny floor.

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© Villa Next Door 2022

Contents of all photographs courtesy to Coby Brinkers, Rik van Hazendonk and to Kadmium, Delft.

Bertus Pieters

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Façades of The Hague #150

Blocks with family apartments, Parallelweg, in between Hoefkade and Vermeerstraat.

These are façades of a recently rebuilt small neighbourhood, Vermeerkwartier, in Schilderswijk, traditionally a working-class district.

They are a mix of owner-occupied houses and rented houses with gardens.

From the outside the barracks-like façade has been softened with orange and red bricks.

The apartments have been diversified, also from the outside.

Some of them have gables, an easy postmodern way of creating some familiarity and conviviality in the street.

© Villa Next Door 2022

All pictures were taken in March 2020.

Bertus Pieters

Façades of The Hague from #146 onwards: https://villanextdoor3.wordpress.com/category/facades-of-the-hague/

Façades of The Hague #1 – 71: https://villanextdoor.wordpress.com/category/facades-of-the-hague/

Façades of The Hague #72 – 145: https://villanextdoor2.wordpress.com/category/facades-of-the-hague/

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Jordan Herregraven, The Untold Histories as Perceived Through the Horse’s Tear; Hok Gallery, The Hague

The rational mind is used to distinguishing dead objects from living objects in the world around us.

In spite of the world being a sphere, the rational mind in fact sees the world as a pyramid.

Its base is dead matter, in the lower middle part are plants and fungi, in the top middle part are animals, and the pyramid’s shiny summit are we, human beings, endowed with a rational brain to manage it all.

In the mean time, dead objects, plants and animals come to life in our dreams and our fantasies.

They play a role in our spiritual education and development, and in the way we experience the world.

They make us care for the world.

In stories and fairy tales animals even speak to us and have rational minds, and dead matter has power over us.

The whole world seems to become one big split off of our minds, a cosmos full of symbols and fetishes.

In fact the world becomes a sphere again, in which death is alive and in which life is in everything.

One might think our minds have appropriated the world, but one may also turn it around: the world has appropriated our minds.

Anyway, objects, texts, installations and etchings by Jordan Herregraven (1990) are still on show at Hok Gallery today (Friday) and tomorrow.

And here is a strong recommendation to take your last chance to see it all!

Now that you’ve come here, you might as well subscribe to Villa Next Door (top right of the page)!

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© Villa Next Door 2022

Contents of all photographs courtesy to Jordan Herregraven and to Hok Gallery, Den Haag.

Bertus Pieters

VILLA NEXT DOOR IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY ADVERTISING ON THIS PAGE!!